NTU Bio-Tech

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Introduction

This institute has been established in August 2006 and began to enroll PhD students since that academic year. The mission of this institute is to provide great research and teaching environment for the following fields that match the directions of our national policies: bioinformatics, nano-biomedical research, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, genomics and proteomics. 

Implication of Logo

DNA is at the center of life. Many studies on life science or development in biotechnology depend largely on unraveling it. Genomic approach thus forms the intersection core among the 3 fields of plant, animal, and microbial biotech in this institute. The microbe in the leaf indicates plant-microbe interactions. The woman head represents the animal and medical fields. The boxes are symbolic for microarray results and represent the bioinformatics. These symbols linked together indicate cross-disciplinary researches that are flourishingly developing in this institute.

Interview of New Assistant Professor, Dr. Shu-Han, Yu

Today we interviewed our new faculty, Dr. Shu-Han Yu, who has immuno-oncology, immune modulation, tumor microenvironment, and microbiome professional with 9+ years of academic research experience and 4+ years of industrial experience. She has committed to transforming expertise in translational medicine into non-small-cell lung cancer precision medicine, microbiome profiling, biomarker discovery, characterization, clinical validation, and potential diagnostics.

Interview of New Director, Professor Mong-Hsun Tsai

Today we are very happy to interview the new director of Institute of Biotechnology (IOB), Prof. Mong-Hsun Tsai, to talk about his research journey. Graduated from the Department of Zoology at National Taiwan University (NTU), Prof. Tsai has established solid biology backgrounds. Prof. Tsai then decided to proceed his master at National Tsing Hua University (NTHU). His study mainly focused on radiation and heavy metal (such as arsenic) induced damages in molecular, cellular, and phenotype levels. For Dr. Tsai’s dissertation at National Yang Ming University, he mainly studied health effects of chronic low-dose radiation exposed subjects who lived in Co60-contaminated buildings for more than 10 years in Taiwan. Dr. Tsai stayed in NIH for 4 years and came back to NTU as an assistant professor in 1996. Prof. Tsai has been employing biochips and bioinformatics tools for agriculture applications and to discover specific biomarkers for cancer outcome prediction. 

Interview of Professor Jen-Chih Chen

Our interviewee today is Prof Jen-Chih Chen, driving by his curiosity, he is now an associate professor in the Institute of Biotechnology (IOB), and his research expertise includes plant defense, molecular biology, as well as bioenergy.

From the interview, we can feel that Dr. Chen is full of curiosity. He is interested in all sorts of biological phenomena, and enjoys dissecting them. He may have changed his research focus to animal studies, but through searching and experiencing, he returned to his beloved plant science. He told us to keep on trying new things and new ways, and by doing so, we may be able to find something really surprising. Of course, there are always challenges, and keeping on trying and enriching your knowledge should carry you a long way during your research.

Interview of Professor Chi-Te Liu

Today we invite Dr. Chi-Te Liu, an associate professor of the Institute of Biotechnology (IOB), to share his journey of research and development. Dr. Liu’s research interests focus on S.E.A, i.e. Symbiosis (Microbe-Plant interactions), Environmental microbiology, and Agricultural biotechnology. The current projects in his lab including (1) development of multifunctional PGPR agents (biofertilizers & biopesticides), (2) exploring the molecular mechanisms of plant-microbe interactions, (3) biodegradation of synthetic plastics, and (4) employing soil-based microbial batteries for sustainable agriculture and energy.Today we invite Dr. Chi-Te Liu, an associate professor of the Institute of Biotechnology (IOB), to share his journey of research and development. Dr. Liu’s research interests focus on S.E.A, i.e. Symbiosis (Microbe-Plant interactions), Environmental microbiology, and Agricultural biotechnology. The current projects in his lab including (1) development of multifunctional PGPR agents (biofertilizers & biopesticides), (2) exploring the molecular mechanisms of plant-microbe interactions, (3) biodegradation of synthetic plastics, and (4) employing soil-based microbial batteries for sustainable agriculture and energy.

Interview of Professor Je-Ruei Liu

Today we invite Dr. Je-Ruei Liu, professor of the Institute of Biotechnology (IOB) and vice dean of College of Bio-Resources and Agriculture, to share his journey of research. With the fast-pace of modern lifestyle, dietary habits are characterized by erratic eating patterns . Malnutrition, unhealthy diet, smoking, stress and so on, are the presentations of unhealthy life lifestyle. Unwanted diseases and afflictions arise from such dietary habits. Obesity is on the rise and has become a chronic problem, along with aging, diabetes, as well as high blood pressure. Another issue in the modern lifestyle is the declining birth rate. More and more people choose to have pets. Yet the number of overweight and obese in our furry family members also is a growing concern. Professor Je-Ruei Liu has been engaged in research on obesity related topics for many years, hoping to apply natural products to delay aging, to reduce pet weight, and to promote healthier diets for our pets.
 

Interview of Professor Li-Ying, Sung

Professor Sung is an expert in SCNT and among the first to report cloned mice using terminally differentiated postmitotic granulocytes, followed by efficient derivation of mouse ntESCs. Her team also cloned cattle and rabbits before.  She excels in embryonic technologies, such as SCNT, pronuclear microinjection, intracytoplasmic sperm injection, blastocyst injection, oocyte and embryo cryopreservation, as well as iPSC technology. Her research interests are embryology, developmental biology, stem cell biology, as well as development of novel animal models to study human diseases including infertility. She is also applying these modern tools to save endangered animals.

Interview of Professor Kuan-Chen Cheng

Being a professor in both Institute of Biotechnology (IOB) and Institute of Food Sciences and
Technology (FST) at National Taiwan University, Prof Cheng proofs his doubtlessly research
experiences in the areas of microbial bioprocessing, fermentation and biotechnology. His
laboratory currently focusing on four major topics which are bioactivity of medical mushroom,
Wine making and brewing, Development of Senior’s Food, and Biotechnology.

Interview of Professor Shih-Shun Lin

Birds migrate south for winter. Fishes swim to their ideal water current. Unlike animals, plants are not able to move freely forces the plants to adapt to the environment. It is a pleasure to invite Prof. Shih-Shun Lin from the Laboratory of Plant Molecular Biology and Virology to talk about gene regulation mechanisms that help the plants to survive from environmental adversity and disease invasion.
 
 

Interview of New Director, Professor Mong-Hsun Tsai

  • 2020-09-08
  • Shu-Han, Yu
The author: Tjita Veny (徐溶佩) & Ru-Ting Yang (楊如婷) 

Today we are very happy to interview the new director of Institute of Biotechnology (IOB), Prof. Mong-Hsun Tsai, to talk about his research journey. Graduated from the Department of Zoology at National Taiwan University (NTU), Prof. Mong-Hsun Tsai has established solid biology backgrounds. Prof. Tsai then decided to proceed his master at National Tsing Hua University (NTHU). His study mainly focused on radiation and heavy metal (such as arsenic) induced damages in molecular, cellular, and phenotype levels. During the research process, Prof. Tsai learned how to collect samples, create questionnaire and other related techniques, which triggered his interests to engage more in public health research. 

For Dr. Tsai’s dissertation at National Yang Ming University, he mainly studied health effects of chronic low-dose radiation exposed subjects who lived in Co60-contaminated buildings for more than 10 years in Taiwan. The chronic low-dose radiation induced health effects were very different from acute high-dose exposure  (for example, the studies from A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan; Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in 1985, and other cases). The results of this very unique chronic low-dose radiation exposure cohort study established in Taiwan are important and has its value in the world for opening up more research aspects of radiation biology. Along his research journey in National Yang Ming University, Dr. Tsai realized the importance of big data analysis and information statistics; therefore, during his postdoctoral training, he began to employ microarray technology and big data analysis to conduct radiation biology research at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in United states. 

Dr. Tsai stayed in NIH for 4 years and came back to NTU as an assistant professor in 1996. Prof. Tsai has been employing biochips and bioinformatics tools for agriculture applications and to discover specific biomarkers for cancer outcome prediction. At the same time, next-generation sequencing (NGS) platform became a very powerful tool that can generate parallel massive sequencing data for many biological and bio-medical applications. Dr. Tsai applied the NGS technology to sequence the entire genome of Mikado pheasant. Dr. Tsai and his team found that a special amino acid replacement in hemoglobin gene made the pheasant become more adaptable to the hypoxia environment. Moreover, the team found the ancestry of genus Long-tailed Pheasant originated from northern China, and they travelled to Taiwan 3.5 million years ago during the ice age and later evolved into Taiwan endemic species. These valuable information provided by the latest sequencing technology allow scientists to better understand the genomic importance of endemics species. 

Finally, Director Tsai wants to encourage young students to learn from different fields and to work in cross-disciplinary teams. Besides your own strong biology background, you should be able to cooperate with people from various fields. Learning to use multiple tools to help students answer and solve interesting questions. Only by constantly improving yourself, you will be able to go wherever you wish and do whatever research you want to do.

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